The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism. Review: The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism 2019-01-10

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism Rating: 8,9/10 964 reviews

“The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism” Carl F. H. Henry

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

The book firmly established Henry as one of the leading Evangelical scholars. Nonetheless, the divergence between the Fuller Seminary of Carl Henry and the Fuller Seminary of Richard Mouw is illustrative of the unraveling of the evangelical movement. I shall begin with what I have in common with his overall thought process. The path seems to be this. It is this contention that Henry adamantly agrees with. . In 1956, Henry became the first editor-in-chief of the magazine , which was founded by evangelist to serve as a scholarly voice for evangelical Christianity and a challenge to the liberal.

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Carl F.H. Henry Quotes (Author of The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism)

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

But it is easier to find a creationist on the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley than it is to find an inerrantist on the faculty of Fuller Seminary. We need a keen world reference. Those who hold an entirely futuristic view of the Kingdom, denying any present realization of it e. Henry argues that a reformation is imperative within the ranks of conservative Christianity, one that will result in an ecumenical passion for souls and in the power to meaningfully address the social and intellectual needs of the world. Henry taught as a visiting professor or guest lecturer at colleges, universities, seminaries, and conferences across the United States and around the world, including in , , , , , , the , the , and. Had some initial quibbles in how Henry set the stage and framed his approach in the beginning, but all in all, this book is a gem. Some social evils: aggressive warfare, racial hatred and intolerance, the exploitation of labor by management.

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The uneasy conscience of modern fundamentalism (Book, 2003) [inquiry-hub.net]

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

Men such as the late J. Dispensationalists and covenant theologians agree on the primary details of the Kingdom of God. And he gives an outline for what mode of attack the Fundamentalists must take. Because of the incarnati Old but relevant call to action Dr. The early Christians had a definite social dimension to their preaching--they addressed the painful concerns of humanity with the following two considerations: 1 they did not compromise the message of Christ and 2 the message of Christ demanded such action. His message rings as true in this century as his own. This does not imply an ultimate paradox, but rather stresses that the kingdom exists in incomplete realization.

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“The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism” Carl F. H. Henry

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

Otherwise, we may find ourselves relevant to contemporary crisis but with nothing left to say. As a consequence, they trained enlightened spectators, rather than empowered ambassadors. The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism. I remembered finding a few valuable insights, but being largely unimpressed. For instance, Henry considered himself a Fundamentalist and applied the term to all evangelicals. A classic work of the nascent evangelical movement.

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The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism : Carl F. H. Henry : 9780802826619

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

His criticisms of social gospel liberalism also proved right with its continued decline. He proposes protest that roots advocacy in evangelical belief while also recognizing that ameliorating social needs without spiritual regeneration through Christ is inadequate. This is a message worth hearing, and though the last 70 years have revealed many sincere experiments, some more successful than others, many Christians continue to isolate themselves from their surrounding culture with a promise of personal, spiritual salvation while ignoring the transformative impact upon the world their Gospel should be having. Christian schools which aim to produce students of the highest academic standards must be founded. Protestant evangelicalism too needs a single voice.

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The uneasy conscience of modern fundamentalism (Book, 2003) [inquiry-hub.net]

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

Sadly, I have to give this book three stars because this extremely important message is obscured by stilted, academic, at times unreadable prose. A church that joins Jesus in preaching the kingdom will too. While at Wheaton, Henry also taught typing and journalism. In 1947, an evangelical consensus on the Kingdom—and its implications for the whole of life—seemed nearly impossible. Furthermore, it is this Gospel, and this Gospel alone, with all of its implications for culture, injustice, war, slavery, racism, politics, and the like, that has the necessary power to actually impact people on a world-wide scale; but only when it is applied and implemented correctly by the hands and feet of Jesus Christ—the Church—is such influence possible. His wife Helga Bender Henry wrote a book in 1955 about the in. Our brightest young people have a renewed intellectual passion.

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“The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism” Carl F. H. Henry

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

The same year that Uneasy Conscience was published, Henry joined with , , , and radio to help establish in. The Bible, moreover, represents this mediated divine disclosure as rational and objective, and not as transcending logical distinctions and the sphere of truth-and-error. Yet, most evangelicalism is precisely that. Having just finished the second reading, I realize that I missed the brilliance and clarity of Henry's overall vision for evangelicalism's cultural engagement. If you're a liberal, social justice gospel. The notion that one can maintain rigorous personal ethics while ignoring and being indifferent to issues of social justice is questionable.

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The uneasy conscience of modern fundamentalism (Book, 2003) [inquiry-hub.net]

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

Henry then expounds a brief kingdom-theology. Culture depends on such a view. The past 30 years have seen an Evangelical Renaissance. It is imperative for evangelicals to take Henry's challenge and address the evils of society. A very thought provoking book on the challenge that faces evangelicals in establishing an identity that keeps the Gospel central, all the while confronting the evils of our day; whether they be political, economic or social. Henry Grand Rapids: William B.

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The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

And I deeply admire and ardently affirm him in such a vision. We must articulate our cultural involvement within a supernaturalistic framework. Often the main points of ethical attention are avoiding alcohol, movies, dancing, card playing, and smoking. Henry Center for Theological Understanding at seek to carry on his legacy. I work at a , and our students are enthused for helping the world. Henry, the father of modern fundamentalism, pioneered a path for active Christian engagement with the world - a path as relevant today as when it was first staked out.

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The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism by Carl F.H. Henry

The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

Here is a passion for a Gospel-centered opposition to evil in all of its social manifestations; here is a passion for entering the public square, demonstrating how Christ's Gospel is the only real hope for the world's problems, and bearing witness of Jesus for the sake of winning souls. As the Spirit of eschatological revelation presupposes the Old and New Testaments, and God ongoingly convicts men of sin and imparts new life to all who believe, his self-disclosure in the world takes its free course daily and hourly, even moment by moment, in a galaxy of revelational witness that renders mutinous man an inexcusable rebel. He sounds like a Kuyperian premillennialist and I appreciate hearing an author holding that tension. Christians ought to take part in political disputes, but never in such a way that causes division between the body of Christ, nor in a way that fails to respect non-Christians. It dismisses Fundamentalism with the thought that, in this expression of the Great Tradition, the humanitarianism has evaporated from Christianity. But also, as Henry so clearly communicated over the course of this book, it is my hope and prayer that Christians be joyful, celebratory people.

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