Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond. Kohinoor: World’s most infamous diamond 2019-02-12

Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond Rating: 5,2/10 920 reviews

Kohinoor: The Story of the World’s Most Infamous Diamond

Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond

When the last Maharaja of Punjab during the sec Interesting account of the history behind the Kohinoor diamond. It is frustrating for a historian , but mystery stories make for good reading. India's gems and diamonds, particularly the Kohinoor, were so popular, that the Afghan ruler, Nadir Shah, couldn't keep his hands off and took the throne, along with the diamond, back to his kingdom. Prince Duleep Singh, left orphaned, much like his motherland, is whisked away and then removed permanently from his homeland. Except for the fact that all over the world there are diamonds which have gone by violence to the victor. Many people believe it is the largest diamond in the world when it is not even in the top 90 any more. For any questions feel free to ask below in comments.

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Kohinoor: World’s most infamous diamond

Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond

Various classical Hindu texts, including the , , , the Ratna Shastra, all talk about diamonds and people's relationship to them. While it had long been a symbol of power every ruler would take up the gem for himself after vanquishing its previous owner , the Kohinoor gained its celebrity status thanks to The Great Exhibition of 1851 in London. There, in a public ceremony, the frightened but dignified child handed over to the British East India Company in a formal Act of Submission to Queen Victoria not only swathes of the richest land in India, but also arguably the single most valuable object in the subcontinent: the celebrated Koh-i Noor diamond. The narrative of Kohinoor sucks you in with its thrilling storyline. On the Gemstone Throne Nader Shah on the Peacock Throne, whose jewels included the Koh-i-Noor diamond. The books starts with the mention of precious gemstones in Indian mythology and their significance in day to day life and their magical abilities. The book is absorbing and retold as accurately as possible, with notes and photographs attached wherever applicable.

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Book Review

Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond

He introduced me to Marwi. When the last Maharaja of Punjab during the second Sikh War lost, the British made the 9-year-old prince cede it to Queen Victoria in England where it remains. The made the ceremonial first cut in a media sensation. The Kohinoor is pe An amazing story of a jewel that encapsulates the history of an entire subcontinent and its colonial rulers. This book also solved query why Ahmed Shah Abdali was also know as Ahmed Shah Durrani.

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A tale of the most infamous diamond ‘Kohinoor’

Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond

Interesting account of the history behind the Kohinoor diamond. From there the East India Company agents prepared the Koh-i-noor for shipment to the British court. What makes it the most beloved, even though there have been jewels far precious than this one? The story is actually damn good but sad to say the writing doesn't convey much energy. Dalrymple states that in ancient times the Indians sifted the diamonds from the sands of stream beds. The cover is as mysterious as it can get, but if it is Ruskin Bond, you cannot expect any less, can you? During the reign of The Lion,the Mountain of Light reached its epitome of prominence. Game of Thrones has nothing on this story. No less than five different nations lay claim to it.

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A tale of the most infamous diamond ‘Kohinoor’

Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond

It is also an important look into how regimens are formed and how they fall, the opulence and grandeur associated with their time under the sun and the pathos and hubris that surrounds the change of guard. When the British conquered the Punjab in 1846, the ten-year-old King Duleep Singh gave it to Queen Victoria. S - Click on the images to buy from Amazon. Various reports including those of watched what would happen to the jewels. The author goes into the relationship the Indians have with gems including culture and religion. It lacks pace and readers would find it hard to read as it seems like sentences are never-ending. The story is actually damn good but sad to say the writing doesn't convey much energy.

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Book Review: Kohinoor

Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond

According to the book, the origin of the Kohinoor or The Mountain Of Light, as translated in Persian, is still uncertain but it is believed to have originated from South India where gems and precious stones of such extravagance were said to have been in use to decorate idols in temples. . A truly despicable man from what I read about him in the book. In fact, rather more history than I expected. The book won the 1990 Yorkshire Post Best First Work Award and a Scottish Arts Council Spring Book Award; it was also shortlisted for the John Llewellyn Rhys Memorial Prize. In 1989 Dalrymple moved to Delhi where he lived for six years researching his second book, City of Djinns, which won the 1994 Thomas Cook Travel Book Award and the Sunday Times Young British Writer of the Year Award.

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Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond

Spanning countries, decades and dynasties, the book provides an incredibly vivid and informative timeline of the diamond's wh 4. Overall, an interesting book tracing the journey of the Kohinoor from Indian mythology to its current residence in the Tower of London- I especially liked the chapters on Ranjit Singh and Duleep Singh of Punjab. History comes alive and it is indeed an enticing tale of the ill famous diamond that now sits in the Tower of London, giving hope to the people of its return to its original land. The gripping story of Koh-i-Noor and its possessors is masterfully woven around Kings, Queens, Princes and Generals and ordinary unsung characters who held or coveted the gem by two of the finest historians of our times, William Dalrymple and Anita Anand. Peppered with well-researched historical anecdotes and events, the diamond occupies the central role around which the world turns and the author weaves the numerous tales.

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Kohinoor: The Story of the World’s Most Infamous Diamond by William Dalrymple

Kohinoor: The Story of the World s Most Infamous Diamond

It's story-telling at its finest and something that the rich and diverse history of the subcontinent deserves. The thought of possessing this brilliant stone was so compelling that it caused conflicts and discord wherever it went, to the extent of bringing entire kingdoms down. Hope you have downloaded the books required for the exams. The book is absorbing and retold as accurately as possible, with notes and photographs attached wherever applicable. According to the book, the origin of the Kohinoor or The Mountain Of Light, as translated in Persian, is still uncertain but it is believed to have originated from South India where gems and precious stones of such extravagance were said to have been in use to decorate idols in temples. There is a lot written about the Koh-I-Noor Mountain of Light in Persia — on and off Wikipedia. From the Holy Mountain, his acclaimed study of the demise of Christianity in its Middle Eastern homeland, was awarded the Scottish Arts Council Autumn Book Award for 1997; it was also shortlisted for the 1998 Thomas Cook Award, the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and the Duff Cooper Prize.

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