James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus. James Hardy Vaux : a literary rogue in Australia (Book, 1944) [inquiry-hub.net] 2019-02-04

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A bicentenary of the first dictionary written in Australia

James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus

Collectively the Australian Convict Sites represent an exceptional example of the forced migration of convicts and an extraordinary example of global developments associated with punishment and reform. As a lifelong Liberal , he encouraged the of convicts and helped bring forward the ending of. In quod, is in gaol. A thief, urging his associates to a division of any booty they have lately made, will desire them to bring the swag to light. By this system of policy, he is said to have a good bonnet if he happens to get boned, and, in a doubtful case, is commonly discharged on the score of having a good character.

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James Hardy Vaux

James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus

To plant upon a man, is to set somebody to watch his motions; also to place any thing purposely in his way, that he may steal it and be immediately detected. A bag, probably a corruption of poke. He became widely known and admired for his work displayed in buildings such as St Matthew's Church in , and. To split signifies generally to tell of any thing you hear, or see transacted. This operation is called trigging the jigger. As townships and police-stations became established and more numerous along the inland rivers in the latter half of the 19th century the sly-grog shops tended more often to be found on the back-blocks and regions further inland, following the squatters and their workers as they developed more marginal areas. A person having engaged with another on very advantageous terms to serve or work for him, will declare that he is upon a good suit.

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Portal:Convicts in Australia

James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus

We recommend that it remain open space and free of development. To quod a person is to send him to gaol. The main manor was built in 1829-1830 in a style. Come, let us toddle, is a familiar phrase, signifying, let us be going. See Nose, and Wear it. The sneak is the practice of robbing houses or shops, by slipping in unperceived, and taking whatever may lay most convenient; this is commonly the first branch of thieving, in which young boys are initiated, who, from their size and activity, appear well adapted for it. Enright, Nick, Blackrock film 1997.

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A bicentenary of the first dictionary written in Australia

James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus

This is most common and gratifying, among persons in confinement or exile, to enliven a dull hour, and probably excite a secret hope of one day enjoying a repetition of their former pleasures. A swag of any thing, signifies emphatically a great deal. Ruse applied to Governor of the colony for a land grant, stating that he had been bred to farming. To scamp a person is to rob him on the highway. The factory idea was a combination of the functions of the British bridewells, prisons and workhouses. A person, whose dress or equipage is in the first style of perfection, is declared to be bang up to the mark. Governor Phillip, desperate to make the colony self-sufficient, allocated Ruse an allotment at Ruse Hill now near Parramatta , where he proved himself industrious and showed that it was possible for a family to survive through farming.

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James Hardy Vaux : a literary rogue in Australia (Book, 1944) [inquiry-hub.net]

James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus

He arrived at on the with 18 months of his sentence remaining. I trust the Vocabulary will afford you some amusement from its novelty; and that from the correctness of its definitions, you may occasionally find it useful in your magisterial capacity. A kid who delivers his bundle to a sharper without hesitation, or a shopkeeper who is easily duped of his goods by means of a forged order or false pretence, is said to drop the swag in good twig, meaning, to part with it freely. In like manner, to prevent another person from succeeding in his object, either by a wilful obstruction, or by some act of imprudence on your part, subjects you to the charge of having spoiled him. . There have been only two different issues of this denomination: a paper note which had a gradient of yellow and red, with a distinct orange background, and a polymer note which can be recognised for its distinct red-orange colouration. Von Bertouch, Anne, The Ride Home, Newcastle N.

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Mandurah sketches : past & present / Brian Hardy ; sketches by Brian Hardy ; edited by Daphne Hardy

James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus

Operational between 1848 and 1854, the factory is now one of the 11 that collectively comprise the , listed on the by. After more trouble in the colony he was sent to Newcastle, where he completed a slang dictionary for the use of magistrates. A sudden escape of one or more prisoners from a place of confinement is termed a bolt. To stash drinking, card-playing, or any other employment you may be engaged in, for the time present, signifies to stow it, knife it, cheese it, or cut it, which are all synonymous, that is, to desist or leave off. See Pull or Pull up. But this term is more properly applied to removing a man by underhand and vile means from any birth or situation he enjoys, commonly with a view to supplant him; therefore, when a person, is supposed to have fallen a victim to such infamous machinations, it is said to have been a jacketting concern. A person of an over-reaching, imposing disposition, is called a nail, a dead nail, a nailing rascal, a rank needle, or a needle pointer.

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Portal:Convicts in Australia

James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus

The first known settlers in Norfolk Island were East but they were long gone when settled it as part of its 1788 settlement of Australia. Please, or to access full text content. To quit a person suddenly in the street, whether secretly or openly, is called turning him up. The dictionary also provides us with evidence for British words in transition, such as swag. Having done this, Ruse received a grant of 30 acres 120,000 m 2 , enabling him eventually to sell 600 bushels of corn.

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James Hardy Vaux

James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus

The first full length autobiography written in Australia, and an uncensored picture of criminal life in London and the convict system in Australia. In consequence, sly-grog shops sometimes of the travelling variety became an institution in these districts, often associated with particular pastoral runs or situated along mail-routes. The abandoned transportation to eastern Australia in 1852. A man convicted of this offence, is said to have been done for a ramp. Potaski is seen as representing the auspicious beginning of the Polish community in Australia. Twopence is called a duce.

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Sly

James Hardy Vaux a Literary Rogue in Aus

To tow a person out; that is, from his premises, or post: is to decoy him therefrom by some fictitious story, or other artifice, while your pall seizes the opportunity of his absence, to rob the place he has imprudently quitted. See Square, and Do the Trick. Two persons having been engaged in a long and doubtful contest or rivalship, he, who by superior art or perseverance gains the point, is said to have thrown his opponent over the bridge. It is not unusual for the buz-coves, on particular occasions, to procure a formidable squad of stout fellows of the lower class, who, though not expert at knuckling, render essential service by violently pushing and squeezing in the crowd, and, in the confusion excited by this conduct, the unconcerned prigs reap a plentiful harvest, and the stallers up are gratified with such part of the gains acquired, as the liberality of the knuckling gentlemen may prompt them to bestow. The star is a game chiefly practised by young boys, often under ten years of age, although the offence is capital. This coup de guêrre is termed making a regular stall at such a place, naming the scene of their operations.

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